About Us and A Letter from Ireland.

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Welcome to A Letter from Ireland.

 

Let me guess - you’ve been interested in tracing your Irish Heritage and Family History for some time now.

 

Maybe you've already travelled to Ireland? Perhaps you wonder if you will ever get here?

 

What you DO know is that your ancestors left Ireland for a better life - bringing with them their values and beliefs, many of which were passed to you and your own family.

 

Since 2013, we've shared our weekly "Letter from Ireland" and it has attracted over Two Million people of Irish descent around the world. They find that our Letters, Blog posts, Videos, books and Podcasts help them to understand what life was like for their Irish Ancestors.

 

For some, this information provides a rich backdrop to help with research on Ancestry Record sites. For others, the Letter connects them with their Irish roots in a very real and visceral way.

 

Here are just some reasons why some of our readers keep coming back to "A Letter from Ireland" for more:

 

“Trace your surname, discover where your ancestors may have lived and step into this fascinating and beautiful land that we love”. Sandy Laferriere.

 

“If you have Irish blood running through your veins, or even if you are just interested in Ireland, this site is essential.” Patty McCoy.

 

“You and Carina are melding a very important aspect of Irish history and heritage to our personal genealogical endeavors. Thanks for bringing it all to life for us!” Jack Healy.

 

 

Now, I think it’s time to introduce ourselves! We are Mike and Carina Collins - a husband and wife team based in County Cork, Ireland.

 

Our Irish Heritage adventure started when we noticed many people asking questions on Facebook about Irish surnames and the homelands of their Irish Ancestors.

 

We started to answer with our local knowledge - and those answers took the form of a weekly email called “A Letter from Ireland”.

 

In each Letter, we share stories of counties, surnames and heroic Irish individuals who made new lives for themselves across the world - often in the harshest of circumstances. Sound like any of your Irish ancestors?

 

Today, we travel around Ireland - gathering stories and sharing them with you through our weekly letters, blog posts, videos and podcasts.

Would you like to see the Letter and Podcast survive and thrive for the future - and receive some personal benefits along the way?

Recent Posts

Come into This World of Celtic Music (#801)

In this episode we explore not just the world of Irish music – but 10 tracks from the extended Celtic family. We use music featured on the TV programme – “The Transatlantic Sessions” – to bring you music and song from Ireland, Scotland, the USA and much more. With lots of chat between each song.…

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My Top Irish Names for Boys and Girls (#747)

In today’s episode we share some old Irish names – quite beautiful ones – that are just some of our favourites for boys and girls. Perhaps you already have one or two in your own family? We also share the story of Jimmy Hasty, an Irish footballer from Dundalk in County Louth and how I…

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Top 10 Letter from Ireland Podcast Episodes

In todays special end of year episode, we look back over 2022 and select the 10 most popular Letter from Ireland Podcast episodes during the year. Something here for everyone! Let’s begin the countdown – starting at number 10 and working our way to number 1: At Number 10: “From The Vikings to The Normans”.We look…

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A Merry Irish Christmas – 10 Old Irish Christmas Songs (#748)

In todays special Christmas episode, we share a selection of old Irish Christmas carols, songs and tunes. Something here for everyone! They include: With lots of chat along the way! We hope you enjoy! You can listen to the show on your computer/smartphone by clicking on the play button above (the triangle with the circle…

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Irish Ancestry Timeline

Using a Simple Irish Ancestry Timeline

When we lived in England during the 1990s, a phrase that I heard many times was “teaching granny to suck eggs”. Maybe you have heard it in your family? It was used in a context of not wanting to insult another person by stating what should be common sense already e.g. standing in front of…

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