A Letter from Ireland:
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Irish Placenames – A Journey along an old Irish Road (#110)

Welcome to Season 1, Episode 10 of the Letter from Ireland Show. In this episode, Carina looks at how Irish placenames are created – and takes us on a journey along an old Irish road.

We are delighted to bring you Episode 10 of The Letter from Ireland Show – a weekly podcast that goes out each Thursday from our cottage in County Cork. Tune in to this episode – and dive straight in to a bit of Irish caint, ceóil agus craic (conversation, music and craic!).

We also send out a weekly letter straight to your inbox every Sunday. Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.and we’ll let you know how to join in the fun.

In this episode, Carina reads two of our letters from Ireland. First up we take a look at how Irish placenames receive those names, and the letter is called: “From Cows to River-Mouths”. Then, she takes us on a journey along an old Irish road – one that was very important to our ancestors in reaching the markets of Cork City: “Come Back the Old Butter Road”.

Listen to the Audio.

You can listen to the show on your computer/smartphone by clicking on the play button (the triangle with the circle around it) below. You can also download the show onto your computer by clicking on the download button. Enjoy!

Join The Conversation.

Do feel free to leave a comment or question in the section below. We’d love to hear from you!

Signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.and we’ll let you know how to join in the fun.

Slán for now,

Mike and Carina.

  • Barbara Van Horn says:

    Lovely voice, but I have hearing loss. As a result, even with my hearing aids, I missed about half of what was said. What would help? Have Carina speak more slowly. Consider close captioning for old folks like me.

    • Mike Collins says:

      Thanks for your feedback, Barbara – we will take your slowing down into mind. Also remember that many of these letters are available on this site in written form. When we get the resources, we will add a link to the relevant letters in each podcast episode so you may read the letters independently. Mike.

  • Linda Kendall says:

    Delightful to hear the letter in Carina’s voice. I enjoy the history. Although my Mother and Grandmother talked to us about Ireland it wasn’t until I began my genealogical trek that Ireland’s history became so fascinating. Thank you. I look forward to receiving this every Sunday.
    Linda

    • Mike Collins says:

      Glad to hear, Linda – new podcast episode should be out each Thursday from now on. I’ll also share the link in the Sunday written letter. Mike.

  • Judith Dolphin Hartberg says:

    Being able to hear a voice from Ireland brought the story to life — after all storytelling is one of the great Irish traditions . . .

  • mary J. Driscoll says:

    Enjoyed the Agnes Mary Clark story… and to think there is a crevice named for her on the moon…. loved the mind Agnes had…. exploring and curious…. mad

  • Pamela Fischer says:

    The oral letters did not coordinate with this week. They were last week’s letters!

  • Sandra Collins says:

    I am proud my ancestors are Irish

  • Jill Hotchkiss says:

    Very interesting. Thanks Carina and Mike.
    Jill

  • Marianne dunne K says:

    Loved the podcast and learned a lot. Just one question. A fort was Dun and Dun was also brown. How do you distinguish one from another? By the spelling? Thanks. Marianne

    • Mike Collins says:

      Interesting question, Marianne. Here is MY answer: the sound/word Dún (meaning fort – pronounced Doon in Irish) is typically associated with places in Ireland. The word/sound Dun (meaning brown/muddy – pronounced Dunn in Irish) is typically a description for a person – and so associated with surnames. However, Irish became so mixed up when anglicised, it is often difficult to tell. Except that MOST placenames with Dun – are talking about a fort. Will that explanation do? Mike.

  • Dennis Duffy says:

    I really enjoy the audio letters but Carina talks a little fast for old timers like me to absorb all the interesting things that she is saying.

    • Mike Collins says:

      Thanks Dennis – I have told her to slow down and I think she took it pretty well. She didn’t say anything, but I think she took it pretty well. Only joking – lets see what we can do! Mike.

  • Margaret says:

    Really enjoyed Carina’s letter “from Cows to River-mouths. Was enjoyable on a windy cold Sunday afternoon to sit back and listen. I also am glad that the other ones were listed as I had a missed a few. I see where Ireland did get hit with a bad storm and some are siting it as the worse since 1961 so hope everyone is well.
    Margaret

    • Mike Collins says:

      Thanks Margaret – all good here alright! About 25% of households without power but that is being addressed. Plenty more episodes to come! Mike.

  • Maureen Gamble says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed the Irish placenames podcast. I was delighted to find out my grandfather was from Cornarone, Galway. The name Cor Na Rona means “Seal on the hill.” The old farmhouse overlooks Galway Bay and is a short 5 minute walk to the water. I can imagine the seal trekking to the high ground for a long look.

  • Larry Smith says:

    My ancestor is Patrick Kenney. Any help to find what area of Ireland he was from would be helpful. All I know is he fought with McNeill’s Rangers during our Civil War and is buried in Springfield, West Virginia.

  • SUNDAY, 10/22/2017. GOOD MORNING, IT WAS SUCH A PLEASURE LISTENING TO YOUR LETTERS, IT REMINDS ME OF MY GREAT-GRANDMOTHER’,. HER NAME IS JULIA FITZPATRICK, SHE WAS BORN IN COUNTY CORK. IT BROUGHT ME TEARS OF JOY TO ME.MY GREAT-GRANDMOTHER WAS MY ROCK AND THE MATRIARCH OF OUR FAMILY. SHE LEFT IRELAND IN 1923 AND ARRIVED AT ELLIS ISLAND, WHERE HER NAME IS ON THE PLAQUE. I’M 4TH GENERATION IRISH AMERICAN AND VERY PROUD OF MY IRISH HERITAGE. I’M LOOKING FORWARD TO LISTENING TO YOUR LETTERS EVERY SUNDAY, AND I THANK-YOU!!
    GOD BLESS YOU AND YOUR FAMILY.
    JOHN ANDREW SHUKER

  • Joanne Cairns-Margeson says:

    Ive been working on my genealogy. Most of my Cairns ancestors lived in Prince Edward Island Canada All the records indicate Irish and Roman Catholic The earliest immigrant is in 1842 a William Cairns, I cannot find any ships records, to narrow down what part of Ireland he’s from. At some point he married. Margaret jackinson or Jackman . wondering if you can help with the Cairns name. Supposedly we come from the O’Cieran clan?????

  • Joan says:

    Great great grandMother: Cisily (O’Donnell) Ferry
    Great great grandFather: Patrick Ferry
    Great-grandfather Owen Ferry
    Born: 18 Jan 1864 in County Donegal, Ireland
    Owen Ferry was born in County Donegal. My notes indicate that Owen Ferry’s birth certificate says “Dunfanaghy, Crossroads, Knockastoler” as the place

  • […] the opening of these roads, Cork Butter Exchange was established and became the largest in the world – up to 3,000 wooden casks of butter […]

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