A Letter from Ireland:
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Irish Surnames and Their Counties

Do you have Irish surnames in your family tree? If the answer is yes, then read on – and discover more about the surnames of Ireland, where they come from – and see if you can spot some of your Irish surnames.

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 All Names

Irish Surnames – All the Surnames on our database.

When a new reader signs up for our weekly Letter from Ireland – we ask them to supply the Irish surnames in their family tree AND the county their ancestor emigrated from. So far we have collected over 21,000 Irish entries in our database of Irish surnames representing over 3,750 different surnames. If you’d like to join us and receive your FREE weekly letter from Ireland, simply click here to sign up.

In this article, I would like to give you an overview of the surnames and counties that have been provided by our email subscribers – with some nice pictorials! First of all, you can see ALL of the Irish surnames in our database at the top of the page. Now, remember that there are 19,000 separate entries so you cannot see them all. The size of the name matches the number of times that name pops up with our readers – so you can see that Murphy, Kelly and Sullivan are clear winners there!

Irish Surnames Overview.

Ok, now – let’s build things up slowly. The next graphic shows you all of Ireland’s 32 counties. You see, when someone provides us with the surname of an Irish ancestor, we also ask them which county they came from. Given that over 98% of our audience now live outside the island of Ireland, this is a good representation of where the Irish Diaspora has it’s roots in Ireland.

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Top Counties

The Counties of Origin for your Ancestors.

County Cork is, by a long shot, the main producer of the Irish Diaspora down through the centuries and decades.

Now, let’s get back to those surnames.

The following are just the top 25 Irish surnames from our readers. Each one typically show up more than 100 times in our database. Is your Irish surname here?

Top 25 Irish Surnames

25 Most Popular Irish Surnames among our Readers

 

Like to add your Irish surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here. 

 

Let’s have a look at even more detail. The following are the 100 most popular surnames among our readers – a real spread from all around the country. We see names that are native Irish Gaelic, names that are Scots originally and some English/Scottish planter names. And just a few Norman and Viking surnames thrown in. Typically Irish!

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Top 100 Names

Top 100 Irish Surnames among our readers.

Finally, here are the top 250 Irish surname among our readers – this is probably as detailed as we can get AND allow you to read all the names. Is your Irish surname here? (Click on picture to enlarge).

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Top 250 Names

Top 250 Irish Surnames Among our Readers.

Irish County Surnames.

One of the things we invite our readers to do when they want to find out more about their Irish Heritage, is to pass on the names of their ancestors and the counties they come from (if known). We have been doing this since 2013 and now (December, 2016) have over 19,000 individuals on the list.

Here are the names that were submitted. Bear the following in mind as you scan through the names:

  • They are segmented by county of origin (NOT necessarily where a surname originally came from, but where the reader says their ancestor came from). This means that some names will appear in multiple counties.
  • You will see just what percentage of our total list of names came from each of the 32 counties.
  • I have included the population of each county in 1841 (when the population was at its highest across most of the island) and 1961 (when the population was at it’s lowest). This gives you an idea of the relative size of each county as well as the effect of famine and emigration on the population between those two years.

County Antrim Surnames.

4.8% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Antrim. The county had a population of 361,000 in 1841. This had increased to 690,000 by 1961 (this is complicated by the later creation of the ‘County borough of Belfast’—I included it here as part of County Antrim).

County Antrim has the distinction of having the highest number of different surnames on the island of Ireland. In other counties, there are many dominant Irish Gaelic surnames that cover percentages of the population. However, Antrim has a history of being ‘planted’ by individual families carrying many distinct surnames from Scotland and England.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Antrim? (Click on picture to enlarge).

antrim

Reader Irish Surnames of County Antrim (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Antrim surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here. 

County Armagh Surnames.

2.2% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Armagh. The county had a population of 232,000 in 1841. This had declined to 117,000 by 1961.

A very ancient part of Ireland—home to many of our myths and contains the cathedral city of Armagh. Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Armagh—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Armagh?

armagh

Reader Irish Surnames of County Armagh (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Armagh surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here. 

County Carlow Surnames.

0.8% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Carlow. The county had a population of 86,000 in 1841. This had declined to 33,000 by 1961.

Carlow town was once the capital of Ireland. A small, but varied, landlocked county. Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Carlow—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Carlow?

carlow

Reader Irish Surnames of County Carlow (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Carlow surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Cavan Surnames.

2.5% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Cavan. The county had a population of 243,000 in 1841. This had declined to 57,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Cavan—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Cavan?

cavan

Reader Irish Surnames of County Cavan (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Cavan surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Clare Surnames.

5.7% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Clare. The county had a population of 286,000 in 1841. This had declined to 74,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Clare—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Clare?

clare

Reader Irish Surnames of County Clare (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Clare surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Cork Surnames.

15.6% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Cork. The county had a population of 854,000 in 1841. This had declined to 330,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Cork—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration. 

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Cork?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Cork

Reader Irish Surnames of County Cork (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Cork surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Derry Surnames.

1.5% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Derry. The county had a population of 222,000 in 1841. This had declined to 165,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Derry—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration. 

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Derry?

derry

Reader Irish Surnames of County Derry (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Derry surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here. 

County Donegal Surnames.

5.6% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Donegal. The county had a population of 296,000 in 1841. This had declined to 114,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Donegal—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration. 

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Donegal?

donegal

Reader Irish Surnames of County Donegal (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Donegal surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Down Surnames.

2.9% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Down. The county had a population of 361,000 in 1841. This had declined to 267,000 by 1961 (I included the County Borough of Belfast under County Antrim).

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Down—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration. 

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Down?

down

Reader Irish Surnames of County Down (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Down surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Dublin Surnames.

2.8% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Dublin. The county had a population of 372,000 in 1841. This had increased to 718,000 by 1961. Dublin city saw a huge amount of inward migration from the countryside over this time. As a result, many Irish surnames are most numerous today in the Capital city as opposed to their original territory.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Dublin—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration. 

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Dublin?

dublin

Reader Irish Surnames of County Dublin (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Dublin surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Fermanagh Surnames.

1.9% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Fermanagh. The county had a population of 156,000 in 1841. This had declined to 52,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Fermanagh—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration. 

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Fermanagh?

fermanagh

Reader Irish Surnames of County Fermanagh (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Fermanagh surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Galway Surnames.

5.3% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Galway. The county had a population of 440,000 in 1841. This had declined to 149,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Galway—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration. 

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Galway?

galway

Reader Irish Surnames of County Galway (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Galway surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Kerry Surnames.

5.5% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Kerry. The county had a population of 293,000 in 1841. This had declined to 116,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Kerry—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Kerry?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Kerry

Reader Irish Surnames of County Kerry (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Kerry surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Kildare Surnames.

0.8% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Kildare. The county had a population of 114,000 in 1841. This had declined to 64,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Kildare—they believe that their ancestor lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Kildare?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Kildare

Reader Irish Surnames of County Kildare (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Kildare surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Kilkenny Surnames.

2.3% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Kilkenny. The county had a population of 202,000 in 1841. This had declined to 61,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Kilkenny—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Kilkenny?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Kilkenny

Reader Irish Surnames of County Kilkenny (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Kilkenny surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Laois (also known as Queen’s County) Surnames.

0.9% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Laois. The county had a population of 153,000 in 1841. This had declined to 45,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Laois—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Laois?

Surname Wordcloud 2016 Laois

Reader Irish Surnames of County Laois (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Laois surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Leitrim Surnames.

1.7% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Leitrim. The county had a population of 155,000 in 1841. This had declined to 33,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Leitrim—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Leitrim?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Leitrim

Reader Irish Surnames of County Leitrim (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Leitrim surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Limerick Surnames.

3.3% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Limerick. The county had a population of 330,000 in 1841. This had declined to 133,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Limerick—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Limerick?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Limerick

Reader Irish Surnames of County Limerick (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Limerick surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Longford Surnames.

1.2% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Longford. The county had a population of 115,000 in 1841. This had declined to 31,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Longford—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Longford?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Longford

Reader Irish Surnames of County Longford (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Longford surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Louth Surnames.

0.8% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Louth. The county had a population of 128,000 in 1841. This had declined to 67,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Louth—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Louth?

 

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Louth

Reader Irish Surnames of County Louth (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Louth surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Mayo Surnames.

9.1% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Mayo. The county had a population of 388,000 in 1841. This had declined to 123,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Mayo—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Mayo?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Mayo

Reader Irish Surnames of County Mayo (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Mayo surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here. 

County Meath Surnames.

1.2% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Meath. The county had a population of 183,000 in 1841. This had declined to 65,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Meath—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration. 

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Meath?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Meath

Reader Irish Surnames of County Meath (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Meath surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Monaghan Surnames.

1.4% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Monaghan. The county had a population of 200,000 in 1841. This had declined to 47,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Monaghan—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Monaghan?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Monaghan

Reader Irish Surnames of County Monaghan (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Monaghan surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Offaly (also known as King’s County) Surnames.

0.9% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Offaly. The county had a population of 147,000 in 1841. This had declined to 52,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Offaly—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Offaly?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Offaly

Reader Irish Surnames of County Offaly (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Offaly surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Roscommon Surnames.

2.5% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Roscommon. The county had a population of 254,000 in 1841. This had declined to 59,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Roscommon—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Roscommon?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Roscommon

Reader Irish Surnames of County Roscommon (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Roscommon surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Sligo Surnames.

2.6% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Sligo. The county had a population of 180,000 in 1841. This had declined to 54,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Sligo—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Sligo?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Sligo

Reader Irish Surnames of County Sligo (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Sligo surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Tipperary Surnames.

4.7% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Tipperary. The county had a population of 435,000 in 1841. This had declined to 123,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Tipperary—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Tipperary?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Tipperary

Reader Irish Surnames of County Tipperary (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Tipperary surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Tyrone Surnames.

2.9% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Tyrone. The county had a population of 313,000 in 1841. This had declined to 134,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Tyrone—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Tyrone?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Tyrone

Reader Irish Surnames of County Tyrone (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Tyrone surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Waterford Surnames.

1.7% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Waterford. The county had a population of 196,000 in 1841. This had declined to 71,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Waterford—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Waterford?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Waterford

Reader Irish Surnames of County Waterford (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Waterford surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Westmeath Surnames.

1.5% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Westmeath. The county had a population of 141,000 in 1841. This had declined to 53,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Westmeath—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Westmeath?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Westmeath

Reader Irish Surnames of County Westmeath (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Westmeath surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Wexford Surnames.

2.2% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Wexford. The county had a population of 202,000 in 1841. This had declined to 83,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Wexford—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Wexford?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Wexford

Reader Irish Surnames of County Wexford (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Wexford surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

County Wicklow Surnames.

0.8% of our reader’s ancestors came from County Wicklow. The county had a population of 126,000 in 1841. This had declined to 58,000 by 1961.

Here are the names submitted by our readers for County Wicklow—they believe that their ancestors lived in this county before emigration.

Did any of your Irish ancestors come from County Wicklow?

Surname Wordcloud March 2016 Wicklow

Reader Irish Surnames of County Wicklow (click graphic to enlarge)

Like to add your County Wicklow surname to our list? Just signup for your free weekly Letter from Ireland by clicking here.

Want to find out what the top 10 Irish surnames are? – click here to find out.

So, that’s it for this Irish surname update. Remember, if you would like to add your surname to our list, all you have to do is sign up for your Free Letter from Ireland below.

  • Mona Rea-Malloy says:

    My family name is Malloy. As far as I know my grandfather came from Belfast.

  • Robert Kelly says:

    I’m a 3rd generation South African trying to trace my paternal Irish roots…My grandparents hailed from Dublin and my father Clifford John Kelly aka Jack Kelly DOB 26/12/1026…dod 1975 was one of a twin to his sister Bella

  • DOROTHY HAROLDSON [NEE WHITESIDE] says:

    I WAS A WHITESIDE BEFORE I GOT MARRIED M Dad was Edison his parents wEre Robert and Lucy.

  • Joyce says:

    My grandfather was Angus McMahon and came to Canada as a boy. How I would like to know more about Ireland and where my great grand parents came from. My love for a country that I have yet to visit is somewhat strange as I have felt this way since I was in grade school!

  • Really would have liked to be able to type in my surname and have a match to a connection come up. Love the footprints and names, just difficult to find my connection. My surname is Storrie.

  • Mary says:

    My grandfather was Cornelius Caffrey – his father was John Caffrey – which County did he come from please.

  • Ann Boylan Gabianelli says:

    My Maiden name is Boylan. My Boylan Family came from County Cavin! Grandmoms maiden name was Kane and her mom was Walsh! Don’t know where they came from? Possibly County Cork?

  • Mick Fitzsimons says:

    It disappoints me to see my surname ‘Fitzsimons’ (pronounced Fitz-sigh-mons), spelt here in at least Meath and Down as Fitzsimmons (Fitz-him-ons). Many people, especially from the USA and Canada (and a few from Australia and NZ), have had their Fitzsimons name misspelled in the past as Fitzsimmons and now think that is the correct way to spell and pronounce the name. Most, especially from the USA and Canada when they find their Irish Fitzsimons family, refuse to accept the correct spelling and pronunciation. The incorrect spelling of the name here only adds to this misconception and confusion. Fitzsimons is the ‘son of Simon’ not the son of Simmons!

    • Mike Collins says:

      Theres a simple explanation for that Mick, the Simon in Fitzsimmons evolved as a French pronunciation across much of Ireland – and so we have the soft “i” in Simon instead of the hard English “i”. When the name was anglicised, it took on the literal spelling of the French pronunciation. Mike.

    • Mel says:

      Can I also add that Fitz, in front of any name meant ‘the illegitimate child of’
      And was to recognise the connection to a family without the legal benefit of acquiring their surname through marriage.

  • angelia borges says:

    My grandfather was Christopher Stephen Armstrong
    M y grandmother was Nancy Bell Common

  • John Patrick White says:

    Family legend states my maternal great grandfather on her mother’s side (her grandfather) was from Belfast His name was James Patrick Keelan. He was killed on day 1 of the Somme July 1st 1916. His daughter my grandmother was Ann or Nancy Keelan. On my grandmother’s mother’s side the story is that her grandparents were Ryan and Rooney allegedly from Ireland’s west (believe Mayo). The Whites hailed from Skerries in Co Dublin I think.

    • Amy Patterson O'Keefe says:

      John, do you know anything more about your Mayo Ryans? I’m descended from John and Julia Ryan, born ca. 1800, emigrated to Ohio. Their son John married Mary Ready. I know Ryan is a very common surname, but I thought it was worth asking!

  • Gaynell Cardella says:

    Anyone have information on the name Carver? I was told the family originated in Ireland but have no records or solid information. Anything would be helpful.

  • Ann Silverthorne ( O'Malley ) says:

    Obviously O’ Malley from Mayo has to be there but I wonder is Fox my husbands mothers maiden name. My mothers maiden name is Glynn. My name by marriage is Silverthorne, don’t think that is Irish!

  • Debra Dewis says:

    My family Bartlet and my great grandmother Hollingsworth and great great great maternal grandmother Patriquin were suppose to come from Ireland

  • Ray Kingsley says:

    My great grand parents were born in Ireland William Bowmman Kingsley born in Boresleigh Tipperary and Susan Eason born in Westmeath they were married in Athlon before coming to Australia does anyone know more about them?

  • Lyn Shaxson says:

    My great grandmother and her family lived somewhere in Wicklow county her name was Ruth Burton her father’s name was James burton the family immergrated to moreton bay on the ship Persia in,,,1856

  • Sandra Bates says:

    My Granfather was named William Henry Lawler. His father was from Kilkenny.

  • Martin says:

    My Grandfather was Thomas Patrick Ryan I don’t know where he was born

  • Susan Quigley Karnick says:

    Looking fir Sur name Hinchy and Quigley. My grandmother was a Sheehan and one was a Butler. Hinchy came from Dingle.

    • Bev says:

      I’m looking for Anne Butler who married Maurice Kelly. Both died in the famine years. From County Kerry according to their daughter Johanna

  • GARY O BRYAN says:

    I am a 2nd Generation South African. My Grandfather was Desmond O’ Bryan and the only vague information we have is that the family O’ BRYAN with the “YA” were from Sligo county area and possibly from Roscommon. But is is extremely vague and inconsistent info. can anyone help

  • Theresa Fitzpatrick Fagan says:

    We visited Ireland in Oct, We just loved it there.My maiden name was Fitzpatrick and i married a Fagan , we are very Irish.

  • Lori Eldridge says:

    I live in Nova Scotia Canada and my paternal grandmother came here from County Cork. She was a Doyle.

  • Anthony Pearson says:

    Callaghan from County Sligo

    • Catherine Nisbet says:

      Some of my relatives were Callaghan from County Derry. A place called Limavady.

      I’m a Scot living in Canada, my mother and her parents were from Limavady.

  • Dianne says:

    I am looking for Tedfords and Woodhouse from County Armagh.

  • Lynne Bortot says:

    I would like to add our family surname McQuaide. My 4th Gr. Grandfather Patrick McQuaide was born in County Down in 1743.

  • Janet says:

    I was told my fathers family came from Ireland in 1700 to Canada. Last name is Guest.

  • James WILLIAMS says:

    I had CALVERT of Tyrone, HARKIN also Tyrone (also reputedly Donegal, McFARLAND of Tyrone (I thought it was a Scottish transplant!). McGETTIGAN of Tyrone, DOUGLAS (also a Scottish invader I thought) of County Cavan (Virginia). BENNET also of Cavan.

  • Marie Maillet says:

    My Great Grandfather Samuel George Cuddy is from Dungannon Ireland. born 1855

  • Maureen Hadfield says:

    My Maiden name was O’Sullivan. My Grandfather came from Dublin. His name was Patrick Francis cant get much more Irish than that.
    My Maiden name was Maureen Jean O’Sullivan

  • Raymond sloan says:

    My great great grandfather come from Cashel. He was a sergeant major in the conaught rangers

  • My grandfather came from mitchelstown county cork and grew up in kings street my Grandmother came from Newry and lived in no 18 murgiddes street Newry

  • R. N. West says:

    I’m sure this is a great and interesting read… except you can’t search a name… Seems like a real miss.

  • michael egan says:

    my surname is egan grand parents from castle rock sligo
    my mothers name was mahon from clare

  • Pamela says:

    My mother’s maiden name is Collins out of county Cork. Her mother’s name was Nash, but I don’t know what county.

  • Claudia Cote says:

    My Gr.Gr. Grandmother was Ellen COLEMAN and I have idea what county, in Ireland she was from but arrived in Canada Circa 1851.

  • Val says:

    Looking for fehilys

  • Carole Moore says:

    Grandmother was IRWIN
    Grandfather was Hall

    Grandmother was TIGH or TIGHE
    Grandfather was MOORE

    Are there any WEBB?

  • Laurel Laurin says:

    I’m from many Irish families, but the most recent were the Siftons of Clonmel Tipperary, the Greggs and Walkers of Sligo ( or nearby) and the Hudsons of Sligo.

  • Linda Phair Richarsdon says:

    Looking for family in Ireland family name is Phair fathers side and Coote on mothers side both from nothern Ireland

  • Darlene Myles says:

    I have the last name Myles and it is m grandfather ‘s last name. I know it is Irish but I gave nothing else to go on.

  • Gary Kines says:

    I’m curious: why make it so difficult to look for names in each county? A simple alphabetical list would be more user friendly.

  • Sylvia McHarg Marsh says:

    Looking for McHarg and Suitor

  • Hilda Duvenhage says:

    Can you tell if the surname “ORR” is also on the Irish list?

  • Vivien says:

    My grandfather’s name was Mc Garva-Ibelieve he came from Ireland.

  • Jennifer says:

    Hi there
    My maiden name was Dunn. Edward Dunn came to Australia in 1856 with his wife Margaret (McMahon) although I don’t have a marriage certificate. They had son Patrick on the voyage, then 12 more children. I am a desendant of their son Thomas.
    I believe they came from Kildare. I think Patrick was Edward’s father, but how to be sure??? 🙂

  • Cathy says:

    My maiden name is Morris. My paternal grandfather was named Thomas Francis Morris and his grandfather, William, and William’s brother came from County Cork via Liverpool to New York City in 1848 and settled in the infamous Five Points area. Within 3 years of their arrival, they were successful saloon owners. Over time, they amassed a great deal of rental property in NYC and built themselves some lovely old Victorian mansions out on Long Island

    My paternal grandmother was Clara Sarsfield. Her parents came to Wisconsin, I believe, where they worked in a dairy. They then moved to just outside Spokane WA where they started their own dairy and built an acclaimed Arts and Crafts style home.

    I would love to know of any contacts in either County who might know of a linkage to their American cousins.

    • Julie Morris O'Rourke says:

      My maiden made is also Morris, my family are from Liverpool and were from Ireland before that, my grandfather was John Morris

  • Pauline Brungar says:

    Cuningham at Ballymena. Note only one “n” not double n together in spelling.
    Also Dickie from Ballymena
    Kirby from Limerick

  • Jenny says:

    I would agree with comments that it would be nice to be able to search by name. If the “word clouds” are formed from data collected from subscribers, presumably these could change as time goes on and more people subscribe? My computer knowledge is not much more than using a keyboard (!) but I would have guessed that it was possible to have a search box which leads to this database?

  • Debbie says:

    Looking for Leahy family of Co Cork. Thomas & Catherine Leahy dtr Mary Leahy sailed on the Mary Harrison aged 25 to Western Australia 1862. Would love to find where in Co Cork they lived and more on the family..

  • Patricia Daoust says:

    My 2X great grandparents came to Canada (Lac-Beauport, Quebec) in the mid 1800’s. They married there. She was Margaret Guthrie and he was Jacob Pierson. From the records that I have found on Ancestry.ca, Margaret was born in December of 1835 and married Jacob in September of 1853 in Lac Beauport. From his age on the marriage records, he was probably born in 1822. Jacob died in 1893 in Quebec and Margaret moved to Ontario to be with my great grandparents in Toronto where is died in 1912. However, that is all the info that I have been able to obtain about them–nothing really of where they came from in Ireland. They were Protestant and in all probability their families originally were Scottish. However, that is all that I have found out about them.

    • Shareen says:

      Find a Chirch of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints church near you and visit their family history center; it is open to the public you don’t have to be a member; they may be able to help you because they have so many resources available and people in the centers to help you!

    • Audrey Macnamara Groff says:

      Hi
      I grew up in Toronto – there were two unmarried Daoust sisters down the street- Indian Rd.Crescent –one was named Hazel. They have both passed away within the last 10 years.
      I have had great results with my family tree doing it with ancestry.ca You can also do the DNA which gives you more connections.
      Good luck

  • Grace McFarland says:

    James McFarland

    Craigback Co. Derry

  • Virginia Hogan says:

    My grandfather came from Ireland name.. …O’Riley

  • François LeBlanc says:

    Is there a way to check the origin the other way around (i.e. typing a family name and the result would show the county of origin)?

  • Helen Ann Sabatini nee McBride says:

    My maiden name was Helen Ann McBride. I was born in Craigavad, County Down, N Irekland. My father’s name was John Fredrick Cobb McBride and my mother’s name was Janet Isobel McBride (nee Rutherford) both born in Belfast.

  • Bennett says:

    My maternal Grandmother’s maiden name was Mulholland, she married a Scot, who’s surname was Combe and his sister (Combe ) married a Scot and his surname was Mulholland. They returned to Overtown, near Glasgow, Lanarkshire Scotland. My maternal grandparents resided in Ontario Canada.

  • Parker or Barker says:

    My ancestors went to Ireland when the potato famine was on They came from Limerick

  • Jan Corley says:

    My g grandfather, Robert Carson McAloney was from Londonderry- Coleraine. He eventually landed in Montreal, Quebec, Canada and then St. Catherines, Ontario where he is buried. I wiould love to know if there are still any living relatives in Ireland. I’d like to visit there some day. My name is Jan Corley living in Peterborough, Ontario, Canada. Thank-you in adavance.

  • Cairine Johnson says:

    My G.grandfather came from Cork name John Driscoll,would like to hear of any people connected . He came to Canada, settled in Quebec (Hull) and Ottawa

  • William Writt says:

    My family name is Writt, ancestors came from county Cavan

  • Noelene Barnes says:

    I’m looking for George Macartney Caldwell and brother Samuel Hercules Rowley Caldwell and their father Rev Hugh Caldwell from Newtownards whose father was a Samuel Caldwell from Derry Ireland.

  • Brittnie R Haas says:

    My family was the Nortons they came over from Ireland in 1847 and settled in Ticonderoga ,Ny ,Usa. Their names were Ellen and Miles Norton. They had a large family of I believe 7 children . I do not know what part of Ireland they are from but I do have know where. I have dates if that would help anyone! I am looking for living descendants so I can compile stories and memoirs for my daughter. All my life I’ve been called a little irsh girl and never really paid any mind to it turns out there is a reason was the nickname has stuck. My red hair came from somewhere and know ! I am on facebook under Britt Richelle iof you have info please contact me!

  • Judith Feeney says:

    Our surname is Feeney. My husbands great grandfather was a tailor on sack villeins Street in Dublin. I have traced back to Thomas Feeney born Ireland in 1844 but can not get any further because of records being destroyed by fire in Dublin. We would love to find out where they lived. Before the family coming to England.

  • Judith Feeney says:

    Our surname is Feeney. My husbands great grandfather was a tailor on sackville Street in Dublin. I have traced back to Thomas Feeney born Ireland in 1844 but can not get any further because of records being destroyed by fire in Dublin. We would love to find out where they lived. Before the family coming to England.

  • Jen Shaw says:

    I believe my ancestors by the name of O’Grady came from County Clare or Galway. Visited the area 3 years ago and felt that I had come “home”

  • Hilda Duvenhage says:

    My Grandfather’s surname was “ORR” can you please tell me if it’s irish.

    • Dennis Robert Orr says:

      Orr is a very common name in County Down and Antrim, I myself am an Orr. There are a number of Orr,s buried in Comber Cemetery. Several Orr’s came out of East Belfast. Working in the Shipyard. My family moved to Canada in 1967. I returned to Northern Ireland in 2014 .

    • Dennis Robert Orr says:

      Orr,s and Cowan’s were closely tied to each other.my Dad John had is mothers maiden name as a middle name Cowan. Orr . My daughter has done extensive family tree search. Hope this helps.

  • Harte says:

    I never see my maiden name Harte what county is it from.

  • Harte says:

    Which county does Harte come from.

  • Christo says:

    I’m a South African and my Grandmother, born Eileen Agnes Parkinson, is believed to be of Irish decent. .

  • Jeff van der van der Walt says:

    I’m Canadian and my grandmother, born Alice Gillespie, is believed to be of Irish decent

  • Patrick de Montbrun says:

    My family name is Laughlin from Strabane N.I. THEY EMIGRATED TO Trinidad & Tobago or came as slaves and started the first newspaper there called the Trinidad Gazette. As it turns out the newspaper in Strabane is the Gazette. I believe that this was in the 1700s…….

  • Annette deSouza says:

    My maternal grandfather was Irish and his name was William Freer, sadly I don’t know where in Ireland he was from. Any info would be great.

  • Robin Robinson Richardson says:

    Looking for McWilliams. My mother’s father’s family was from Ireland. Thinking they were from up north but not sure. My mom was named Clare.
    My dad’s side has McCabe, Brown, Fitzpatrick Brownlee, Graham and Robinson. Thought maybe Robinson was English?

  • Barbara Rosethorne says:

    Here are my 2nd great-grandparents.

    Catherine Haggart (1835) from Roscommon & Hugh Gallagher (1833)from Leitrim.
    They came over to England in the early 1850s, they apparently met on the boat.
    They married in 1854 in Birmingham, their family lived in Bordesley for the rest of their lives.

  • Rosemary Pike says:

    My gt gt grandfather was Christopher Taylor from Sligo, came to UK in 1848 with his wife Catherine..

  • dolores mac gillivary says:

    Yes my Dad’s family are Murphy’s from Cork.Was in Ireland …LOVED IT!!! FROM ALBERTA CANADA.

  • John Sharp says:

    My mother’s ancestors were from Antrim in Ulster – McElman. They settled in Canada in 1764. Various forms of the name were Mckilmun, McIlmun, McElmun, McIlmon etc. These names are now extinct in Ireland, but common in Nova Scotia Canada.

  • Sharron Hanrahan says:

    Looking for Hanrahan Found some in USA but still a lot in Ireland Any help really appreciated,, My Grandfather Micheal Joseph Hanrahan came to New Zealand with his Brother Thomas still leaving a big Family in Ireland

  • Would be so much easier to check the surnames if they were listed alphabetically rather than pictorially.
    My wife’s name is Kinlan and she is sure that she has Irish descendants.

  • Jean Crozier says:

    I am seeking others with the surname Crozier, descendants of those who remained behind when my ancestor, Richard Crozier, emigrated from Tyrone to Canada in about 1835. I have so far been unable to find the names of his parents or any other relatives, although I continue to search in both Canada and Ireland, through websites, online searches, and archival research. Any thoughts or assistance would be so appreciated.

  • Manmohan Rai says:

    My wifes’ maiden name is O’Brien, her parents names Robert James O’Brien and Enid Mary O’Brien nee McGowan, Grandparents are James O’Brien and Mathilda O’Brien nee Joseph and Great Grandfather is Timothy O’Brien.

    We believe this O’Brien family hail from County Cork, but Robert James O’Brien was born in Calcutta in 1900 and James O’Brien married Mathilda Joseph in Calcutta on 18th February 1884.

    We would love to know more about their Irish heritage and roots.

    Kind regards

  • Marilyn says:

    My great great grandparent were born in Antrim Ireland my great great grandfather was Greer and my great great grandmother was Mcglathery

  • Joan Palmer(nee Hodgins) says:

    I was looking for Hodgins in county Tipperary.

  • Karen McNamara says:

    I am a descendent of the McNamara’s of County Clare and the Scott’s of County Antrim. I have been finding many of my McNamara relatives had lived in County Antrim, but history says the McNamara seat is in Clare. I’m looking for additional McNamara and Scott connections in either County.

  • David Williams says:

    I see the name Mulligan there but my family’s name is Mullighan. Can you tell me what the difference is please?

  • Brenda Hall says:

    My great gr and father,Richard Foy, was born somewhere in Ireland about 1843. His father was Patrick. He was an orangeman. He married Jane Madden in Manchester Cathedral in 1867. Does anybody know where he came from, please.

  • Laurel Rockliff says:

    Where did the Dinning name originate? Plantation ?
    Also Sperring, Spierin, and derivatives ?

  • Max Byerlay says:

    My great Grandmother’s name was Mary Lucy and though she was born in Wales, her family came from County Kerry. I do not see the “Lucy” name on any of these area maps and particularly not in Kerry.

  • Lynn-Marie Nugent says:

    My surname is NUGENT and I have traced my line back to my 2 x gr.grandfather Francis who was born about 1799. He lived and died (1869) in Co.Tryone but I have not found any record of his being born there. It was interesting to see that the NUGENT name does show up in 7 of the counties. I knew that the NUGENT name was significant in Co.Westmeath but I can find nothing to connect my family to this prestigious lineage. I shall start researching some of the neighbouring counties to Tyrone for a birth record for Francis. He was married to Elizabeth (aka Isabella, Bella) who may also have been a NUGENT before her marriage to one, perhaps a cousin of Francis but I have had no luck in finding a birth record for her either. She was born abt. 1813 and died in 1903 in Cookstown, Co, Tyrone. I enjoyed looking at the surnames, not many Irish names start with N do they?

  • Dorothy says:

    My great grandfather’s name was Dewitt Dudley. Yet I don’t know what region the family came from. I have been looking for a while.

  • Beth Mooney says:

    My Murphy family came from Roscommon. Have yet to find out where our Mooney family came from.

  • Beverly Kay Gunn Barham says:

    My Family’s surname is McElgunn. My 3rd great grandfather, John James McElgunn
    Birth ABT 1790 • Fermoy, Cork, Ireland
    Death 1863 • St. Malachie, Quebec
    married Anna Southwell
    Birth 1796 • Ireland
    Death 1886 • St. Malachie, Bellechasse, Quebec,
    Their son, John James McElgunn, my 2nd great grandfather
    Birth 5 AUG 1836 • Galway, Ireland
    Death 27 OCT 1913 • Brookings, Aurora County, South Dakota, USA
    I would love to find the family parish(es).

  • Marie says:

    Family of Donegan and Callghan from County Meath.

  • mary says:

    Is McGaughty an irish name

  • Patricia Newell says:

    My maiden name was WARD–I was told ancestry was Iris—I have no idea where or when ansestors came from in Ireland My late hubby was from Irish ansestory also His last name was Newell His family crest was of 3 crowns and 3 wells meaning he was from royalty

  • Robert says:

    Well my great grandfather name is Robert Draney I’m not sure last name is irish or scotish thats my grandmother dad rose draney from spances bridge I’m from merritt b.c canada

  • Jean says:

    Hugh Patrick Duffie
    Grandfather. Died before I was born.

  • Lucinda says:

    cindy_chrissley@hotmail.com

    He grandfather Patrick Chrisley

    Cannot find anything on him

  • Maureen MacDonald says:

    my great grandfather’s name was BAILE. can you tell where that is from?

  • Rae Smith says:

    My mother’s maiden name was McAtee,what county did tnat name from. Her grandfather was John Kinnie/ Kynnie McAtee.

    My fathers grandfather was Isaac Fernihough……where in Ireland did they come from?

  • Stef Edwards says:

    My ancestors name is Kesby do you have any information about that name? Thanks

  • Marilyn Bain says:

    My Great Great Grandmothers maiden name was Atcheson and i believe they came from Dromhoney, County Armagh…but only found name in County Cavan…it can be very confusing when you don’t know much about their history.

  • JULIE O'Quinn ILHARDT says:

    My Maternal grandmother was named Clementine O’Quinn and my middle name is O’Quinn.

  • Louise Melton-Breen says:

    My husband’s family ( Breen surname ) is from County Wexford

  • Joann McKinnon Chaves says:

    Father was McKinnon, Mother, Ahearn, Grandparents Glynn.

  • Gail Sweeney says:

    My great grandad Denis was yet another Ryan from Tipperary. He was in the army so his kids were born in different locations over Ireland and England. Luckily my grandad Thomas Ryan was born in Armagh so I am now the proud possessor of an Irish passport. My great grandmother was Margaret White from Kells, Co. Meath. The Sweeney side is a bit further back so tracing them is being a tad more difficult.

    • Gail Sweeney says:

      As well as Ryan, White and Sweeney I also have Feeney, McGuire, Regan and Phillips (and a different line of Sweeneys) but these are all of unknown location as of yet. Lots more work to be done on my part.

  • Tim Carson says:

    I found my surname Carson in County Antrim and County Armagh! Thanks!

  • Suzanne Weis says:

    My mother’s family was Cork, they to America sometime in the late 1800 or early 1900 hundreds. My mother’s father name was Timothy Edward Driscoll but I’m not sure of his fathers name. They said they drop the O in O’Driscoll after they got to America. I’m not sure if my grandfather was born in America.

  • Pamela Joyce Richardson says:

    Looks interesting

  • Sharon says:

    We are Cline and I was told Killclone from County Mayo

  • Mary Lou Falvey says:

    Family name Falvey or O’Falvey possibly from County Kerry

  • Ken Mara says:

    My last name is Mara and I looked through all the wordless and couldn’t find mt name

    Could not find my name Mara, anywhere?

  • Kathy Harris says:

    My father, Cornelius Kelleher, born in County Cork in 1902. The family remains in Ireland.

  • Kline, carolyn says:

    Great grandmother Margaret Lowry came from somewhere near Belfast… Have no Idea where to search for her history, She moved to Toronto Canada while a young woman and married a school teacher Thomas Lean

  • Marylin says:

    My grandmother was Suzanna Mc Randall from Belfast.

  • Linda Nicol says:

    Maiden name was Knapton and my mother’s maiden name was Pinfold and her mother’s was Greensides. I am told we are of Irish, Scottish and English descent.

  • Marilyn Dwyer says:

    My Ancestors from Ireland to Canada – Dwyer, Ballysheehan Tipperary; O’Meara, Tipperary; O’Dea unknown; Collins from Timoleague & Bandon Cork; Turner from Donnaghmore Wexford

  • Rosanne Newton says:

    One of my ancestors came fromDromore, Tyrone. His name was James McGrath and he was sent to Australia as a convict. After his conditional pardon, he married Susan Corrigan in Sydney, NSW. James and Susan had three children, a girl and two boys. Henry and James were the sons and my grandmother was the eldest daughter of Henry McGrath. Her name was Susan Annie McGrath and they lived firstly at Camberwara and then Green Hills outside Nowra. Henry also had a property at Braidwood in NSW as well as one at Bundanoon, NSW.

  • Neil Baehnisch says:

    My Grand mother on my mother’s side was a McNally. I’d love to find where they came from in Ireland. Please help.

  • Jill says:

    I believe my great-grandmother Anne Frances Moran came from County Mayo in 1901 or 1902, possibly from Carrowmacloughlin. Her parents were Patrick Moran and Nora Roach.

  • Ben Snow says:

    I was told that my Snow Family came from County, Cork, Ireland.

  • Kathleen (McCarthy) Ames says:

    My great-grandparents (or possibly great-great) were Patrick and Mary McCarthy. They are buried in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Sadly I don’t have any other information about them.

  • Harriet Janice Ottenstein says:

    That was fun to look at! My great great grandmother Ellen Dooley from Kilkenny married Arthur Donnelly (who came from Belfast it is said) my great great grand father. Their daughter, Rose Donnelly married John Hughes. John Hughes is very confusing as to where he really came from in Ireland. I will guess Belfast. Their son, Joseph Hughes was my grandfather. All these folks settled in Paterson, New Jersey. Mary Norwood was my maternal grandmother. Her father came from Monaghan. Family names: Quigley, Donohue, MacFarlane, Brophy. My mother was Julia Norwood-Hughes.

  • Mary Wright says:

    I have a John Barr from county Antrim. He may have been from Cairncastle. There was a letter dated 1792 from a Reverend there about his naturalization. He was a Dyer of cloth. I also have a Sarah Jane Steele who married an Adair in Pennsylvania in 1836. I have no idea where she came from in Ireland. Where did the Steele families live? Pretty sure she was Protestant. Thanks

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